In their book Biospirituality, Jesuit priests Peter Campbell & Edwin McMahon further discuss this notion of "trusting the space." They call it letting go of the reins, which is more like "being carried." It is a different psychological stance, a different physical feeling. Our center somehow changes; it becomes less precise, thus broader in scope. In a sense we become what's been termed "precariously generalized." All of a sudden our scope of awareness expands. We feel and respond out of
something bigger than our ability to control. We begin not so much as to solve problems but rather to gain new perspectives. There is a difference, they say, between solutions we think out in our minds versus gifted resolutions, the kind that sometimes come to us in the morning after a good night's sleep. (There's an old saying to the effect that "when you don't get what you want, go get something better." In other words, we recontextualize the
situation to allow for newer, more inclusive, and perhaps more
satisfying outcomes.)

Control freaks won't get too far with this guy

Not so tight,
cowboy

5) The initial signs of success appear to be two:
First, we suddenly gain a confidence that our efforts will bear fruit. Second, things
begin to flourish around us, perhaps even in ways unanticipated.

6) We must endeavor to provide something that buyers feel is greater in value than the price they've paid for it - we must over-deliver. To use the
analogy of little kids in the playroom, we must leave the joint cleaner than when we first found it
.

Character
If we're going to use the platform of massage to help us move forward into the realm of results, to help the dog catch his tail, we're going to set a certain tone in doing so. We will refuse to achieve results at any cost, including that of our own integrity.

Said
General Norman Schwarzkopf: "Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without the strategy." (The
scheming and conniving.)

Said
Einstein: "Real human progress depends not so much on inventive ingenuity as on conscience."

A scary to-do list

We will operate therefore as if conscience and character, not clever to-do lists, are the driving forces that will melt obstacles. We will look at spaces and situations and then determine what is needed and wanted that no one else is providing.

Presence of Mind
If you want to put a massage practitioner on the spot, ask her or him point-blank why you should get a
massage. If they reply, "Because it helps put your body and mind in The Zone," they wouldn't be too far from the mark, though on the other hand they wouldn't be scoring many style-points in the glamour-and-trendy department, nor would they get very far in an exam.

By pulling energy down from the head and dispersing it more evenly through the body, a properly delivered massage gives us the tools to think more
comprehensively, outside the box, so to speak, or as Taco Bell would say, outside the bun. Since the properly massaged body is now closer to a state of physical equilibrium, its mental counterpart is enhanced as well, that of
equanimity, one of the major goals of massage.

Principle:
Physical
equilibrium
engenders mental
equanimity.

Equanimity basically means evenness of mind under stress, or the ability to think on our feet when the going gets nuts. The French would call it sangfroid or "cold blood," meaning self-possession under strain. I picture it as a captain leading a ship through a storm, centered at the stern, not succumbing to distractions, living in the present
moment as if his life and the lives of his crew depended on it.

Another tool that a superior massage will leave you with is a cousin of equanimity, namely
forbearance, which basically means a level-headedness that's not heavy-handed or overbearing. The word also implies restraint and patience, not to mention consideration for the thoughts and feelings of other people.

Another cousin we need to invite to this party is one named
steadiness. For all that's been written about the ancient Hindu classic known as the Bhagavad Gita, it's been basically described as an owner's manual on how to achieve this state.

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